Archives

All posts for the month January, 2013

Creepy Carrots!, by Aaron Reynolds

Published January 3, 2013 by Dagmar

creepycarrotsYes.  Carrots can be creepy, very creepy.  Jasper Rabbit’s passion for carrots gets him in trouble.  I tried this book with younger listeners and didn’t get much of a reaction.  Then, I tried it with my older students who loved it.  I love the great illustrations by Peter Brown.

Synopsis: Jasper Rabbit loves carrots and heads for Crackenhopper Field where he finds plenty of carrots to eat and eats them constantly. Until one day, when he starts to think that the carrots are following him.  Everywhere he looks, there are shadows of carrots that only he sees.  Finally, so spooked by the carrots, Jasper takes action and rids himself of the carrots once and for all, much to the carrots’ delight.

This book won a Caldecott Honor in 2013.

The Sneetches and other Stories, by Dr. Seuss

Published January 3, 2013 by Dagmar

sneetchesOne of my favorite Seuss books and always a great read aloud for my fourth through sixth graders who tell me that even though they’re older, they still like to be read to.  In fact, my older readers love listening to the Sneetches every year.  This year, I included the other stories, which they really liked.  Included are The Zax, about a north-going Zax and a south-going Zax who stubbornly won’t budge when they find each other blocking their way.  (reminscent of today’s Congress – a fact not lost on our teachers as I read the book.)  Too Many Daves about Mrs. McCave who had 23 sons and named them all Dave.  Lastly, What am I Scared of?  “Then I was deep within the woods, When, suddenly, I spied them.  I saw a pair of pale green pants With nobody inside them!

Pete & Pickles, by Berkeley Breathed

Published January 2, 2013 by Dagmar

petandpicklesWow.  What an incredible book.  I don’t know if it’s the amazing illustrations or how much I love both Pete and Pickles that makes me love this book so much.  It’s a story about new friends and the strength of friendship. My fourth,  fifth and sixth graders absolutely loved it.  The illustrations are beautiful and are drawn with humor.  Highly recommended.

Synopsis: Pete is a perfectly practical and uncomplicated pig until he meets Pickles, an elephant who is trying to escape his miserable life at the circus.  When Pete rescues Pickles, Pickles opens up a new life for Pete, filled with adventure …and complication.  Pete has just about had it with Pickles when a pipe bursts in the house and begins to flood the house.  The water is rising and threatens to drown the friends.  Pete sits at the top of Pickles’ trunk reaching the last air at the top of the house.  Pickles, underneath Pete, can’t breathe at all…unless Pete helps him.  Students wait with baited breath to see if the two friends make it through the night.  Read and find out.  You won’t regret it.

One Tiny Turtle, by Nicola Davies

Published January 2, 2013 by Dagmar

onetinyturtleA wonderful non-fiction picture book about a loggerhead turtle’s life from the time when she is as tiny as a bottle top to her return to the beach where she is born thirty years later.  There are two layers to the book.  The larger print provides a great real aloud for first graders.  The smaller print provides more detailed information about turtles.   The illustrations, by Jane Chapman, are beautiful, colorful and full-page.  My young audience was captivated and clapped when we finished.

Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs, by Mo Willems

Published January 2, 2013 by Dagmar

goldilocksFrom the author of the easy reader Elephant and Piggie series, and books about that naughty pigeon who wants to drive a bus, here is a great picture book for older readers.  It’s the Goldilocks story, re-told with dinosaurs and chocolate pudding.  Snarky humor abounds as the dinosaurs leave everything in their house, “just so” in order to facilitate the arrival of “a little succulent child” who might “happen by our unlocked home”.  Of course, soon enough, “a poorly supervised little girl named Goldilocks” happens along.  A must read for older readers who want a laugh.