Wordless books

All posts tagged Wordless books

Quest, by Aaron Becker

Published October 20, 2014 by Dagmar

questQuest is the incredible sequel to Aaron Becker’s 2014 Caldecott Honor Book, Journey.   It, like Journey, is a wordless book with breathtaking illustrations.

I particularly like to use wordless books with my fourth graders.  They are a restless bunch, usually wanting to talk amongst themselves rather than listen to a read aloud.  With a book like Quest, I stand in front of my students and page through the book for them as they “read” it to themselves.

Even those students who were reluctant to pay attention quieted quickly.  Quest held their attention so well, you could only hear the whispers as they “read” this book and said soft “aahhs” at the beautiful illustrations.  At the end, my intractable group smiled and clapped.  They loved it!

Quest begins at the end of Journey.  (To be sure my students understood this, I showed them Journey first and then Quest.)  The two children, a boy holding a purple crayon and a girl holding a red crayon, meet a king who gives them a written message, with multiple colors on it.  The king is abducted by soldiers and taken away.  The boy and girl use their crayons to try to save the king using the clues in the message he gave them.  To see if they succeed, read this wonderful book and enjoy.

Journey, by Aaron Becker

Published March 4, 2014 by Dagmar

Journey Journey is beautifully illustrated wordless book and uses color very effectively to tell a story of a good deed and its reward.

As I paged through the book for my classes, I could hear my students whispering the story to themselves.  Their spontaneous applause when I finished the book matched my feelings exactly.  I love this book so much that I’ve shown it to countless adults since first reading it.

A lonely girl takes her red crayon and draws a door in her bedroom wall.  The door leads her into a beautiful forest filled with lanterns and lights.  There she finds a small stream.  She draws herself a boat and follows the stream to a beautiful city.  The city could be from medieval times with its stone walls and golden domes.  She floats through a city canal.  When she comes to the end of the canal, the girl draws herself a hot air balloon.  She flies away and sees a purple bird flying away from city soldiers.  When the soldiers catch the bird and place it in a cage, the girl steals the bird’s cage and frees the bird.  Caught by the soldiers herself, the girl is suspended in her own cage.  The grateful bird brings her a crayon so that she can draw herself a magic carpet.  The girl follows the bird until she finds a door.  When she opens the door…well, you’ll have to read Journey and find out what happens.

This is a book you won’t want to miss and that you and the children you read to are bound to read over and over again.

Red Sled, by Lita Judge

Published January 12, 2014 by Dagmar

red sledI’m a huge fan of wordless books for kids.  This genre has really grown.  It includes books for young students, like one of my favorites, A Ball for Daisy, by Chris Raschka, and complex and beautiful wordless books like The Arrival, by Shaun Tan, meant for middle schoolers.

Younger students and particularly students who aren’t reading yet get such a feeling of confidence when they can read a story on their own.  In the case of my library, students sit quietly and watch the story unfold as I turn the pages for them.  Sometimes I have them tell me the story that they just “read”.  This time, we just closed the book and smiled.

The Red Sled is not a completely wordless book.  The only words that appear are onamatopoeias. The book opens with a red sled sitting outside a house in the snow.  A bear wanders by and notices the sled.  He decides to take it for a ride, and what a wild ride it is!  Soon, a rabbit joins him, then a moose, then two raccoons, an opposum, a porcupine and a mouse.  The illustrations are wonderful, particularly the animals expressions as they tumble down the hill on the red sled. My students were so quiet as they read the book, then, they started smiling and soon they were laughing out loud.  After the animals finish their sled ride, the bear replaces the sled at the door of the small house.  The child who owns the sled walks out the next day, picks up his sled and notices bear tracks.  The book closes with the child swinging from the antlers of the moose as the animals go on another sled right that night.

This is a sweet, quick book that kids will really love.

A Ball for Daisy, by Chris Raschka

Published March 9, 2013 by Dagmar

A-Ball-for-Daisy

The 2012 Caldecott Medal winner.  This is a terrific wordless story.  Students can follow along as I turn the pages and they “read” about Daisy the dog and her love for her red ball.  One day, Daisy goes for a walk in the park with her owner.  Daisy and a brown dog play with her red ball.  When the other dog pops Daisy’s ball by accident, and the ball is thrown away, Daisy goes home and puts her head on her paws.  No words are necessary to know exactly how Daisy is feeling.  Everyone’s hearts go out to her.  When Daisy goes to the park the next day, there is the brown dog with a blue ball.  They play together.  The book closes with Daisy happily sleeping on the couch with her new blue ball.

This book was so fun to show my K and Prek students.  The library was absolutely silent as my K students realized they had to follow each of the pictures in order to understand the story.  We then went through the book together as students retold the story.  My Prek students tended to shout out what they thought was happening.  Either way was fine and very entertaining to watch my students faces as I turned the pages.

The water color illustrations really shine.

Zoom, by Istvan Banyai

Published January 23, 2013 by Dagmar

zoom2If you’re looking for something to quiet those chatty sixth graders, stand up, hold up the book Zoom, tell them that they’ll miss everything if they don’t watch every page, and start turning pages.  With each page turn, my students ooohed and aahed until the end of the book.  Zoom is a book that I find amazing in its concept, zooming in on the smallest detail and then zooming out over and over again.  I absolutely loved it, as did my students.  No need for words; and, the silence in that room was just bliss.  Highly recommended as a “read aloud” for older students.